Moving from the U.S. To Canada. Will continue to work in us.

This forum deals with all aspects of immigration to Canada, landed immigrant status, work permits, etc.

Moderator: Ron Liberman

Post Reply
Raedwa01
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Jul 05, 2015 10:10 pm

Moving from the U.S. To Canada. Will continue to work in us.

Post by Raedwa01 » Sun Jul 05, 2015 10:21 pm

Im sure this has been asked before, but it's been some time and I'm not sure how tax laws have changed.

We are thinking of moving from the U.S. to Canada on a permanent basis. I currently work as a contractor for a company in the U.S. and plan to continue to do so for the foreseeable future.

Currently, I am making somewhere north of 150K in U.S. Dollars. If/when we move to Canada, how does this effect my taxes? I would do all my work from my home in Canada with an occasional weeklong trip to client sites in the U.S. I know the weeks I am in the U.S. would be deemed U.S. based income, but would the remaining not be? Also, I know the IRS has restrictions on incomes over a set level to avoid tax dodging. Truth is, I plan to stay in Canada for the foreseeable future, so I'm not trying to dodge taxes, I just don't want to be double taxed more than I need to be.

I currently own an LLC in the U.S. As well and can bill through it if needed, but I think they are recognized as corporations in Canada and if I ever moved back, my profit from the business would be taxed steeply by Canada as a penalty for leaving.

I really don't want to renounce my citizenship as I would like the option to move back, but is that the only way to avoid US taxes?

nelsona
Posts: 15811
Joined: Wed Oct 27, 2004 2:33 pm
Location: Nowhere, man

Post by nelsona » Mon Jul 06, 2015 9:50 am

The tax queationsshould be asked on the tax forum.

But, do you have the legal right to live in Canada? You cannot simply move there without a visa status, or Cdn citienship.
Nelsona Non grata. Non pro. Search previous posts. Taking period between now and June off. Will only answer sporadically.

Raedwa01
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Jul 05, 2015 10:10 pm

Post by Raedwa01 » Mon Jul 06, 2015 9:56 am

I will have to go through immigration, but I should have little difficulty with it. My wife is a dual citizen. She was born and raised in Canada, moved to the U.S. On a fiancé visa, and became naturalized 4 years ago. Our on is a de facto dual citizen with his mother being one. I'd need to get forms filled out for Canada to recognize him, but should be a formality. It would just be me that would need to go through immigration, and being that I would be self sufficient should go a long way toward the process I would imagine.

nelsona
Posts: 15811
Joined: Wed Oct 27, 2004 2:33 pm
Location: Nowhere, man

Post by nelsona » Mon Jul 06, 2015 10:07 am

It should be. See me on the tax side.
Nelsona Non grata. Non pro. Search previous posts. Taking period between now and June off. Will only answer sporadically.

JohnKerry
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue Jul 14, 2015 2:36 am

Post by JohnKerry » Tue Jul 14, 2015 2:39 am

Thank you for your answer, that helped me too!
I would be good to make good use of your answer!
I click on the hang of it!

_________________________________________________________
And I love to create friends,Because: Buy RS Gold to be along side friends
invited here: RS Gold

Post Reply